Life in the time of Covid.19 – Self isolation as a teenager. Day 2

Day 2: a new normal

Today I woke to the sun shining through my window. I allowed myself a lie in, in comparison to a regular Tuesday morning, getting out of bed around 9am. I started the day off with a long field walk with my dog. Because of the recent lockdown I’m now only allowed out once a day. Thank goodness I have a big family, so my dog will be able to get his usual three walks a day just with a different person each time.

It’s my Grandma’s birthday today which makes me sad as I can’t visit her. Usually, each year we drive to her house as a family and drop off the present we had bought for her, usually including a homemade birthday card. Sadly this year, that won’t be possible. In place of the face to face birthday visit we decided to FaceTime her as a family. I suppose that from now on – for quite some time – FaceTime will be the closest contact to others that I’ll get.

My new thing that I tried today was cutting and then shaving my brother’s hair. This was really fun to do and kept me and him busy for quite some time. He decided it was worth the risk letting me shave his head because he’s not going to have any social contact for the next few weeks anyway, so if it went badly, it wouldn’t have mattered! I’m not sure if I would guarantee this activity generally though, could get messy 🙂

 

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Life in the time of Covid.19 – Self isolation as a teenager. Day 1

At Play Scotland we have always been aware of the importance of play for everyone – and equally aware that teenagers and young people do not call what they do in their free time “play”.  However, the new restrictions on their freedoms will make what they usually do less easy and sometimes impossible – so how will they get the ‘play’ they need, remain in contact with their friends and deal with the stresses of this new world?  We asked a teenager to keep a diary of their thoughts…


Day 1: the beginning

I wake up to my alarm and think about what I could get up to today. I have no school which means no homework. This is a pleasant change from my usual Monday mornings. For me, schools being shut down makes me very pleased. But for some of my friends, this isn’t the case. Due to the fact of me being in my final year of high school, most of my classmates were counting on the next few weeks of school to give them the time to finish assignments which could help them get into university. The cancellation of exams has also been an added stress for those who had conditional offers for colleges and universities. The early school closures has left my year without a leavers day, a prom, a yearbook and lots of other sixth year events that we will sadly miss out on.

I’ll going to try my best to make this change of events into a positive thing. Every day I am going to try and do something I enjoy or something I’ve never done before. I will also make sure to get lots of fresh air and exercise. This will keep me busy and mentally stimulated throughout this pandemic which I think is vital. Today I am going to bake my favourite brownies. This will keep me occupied for a couple hours and will be a special dessert for my family and I after our dinner.  At least that’s my plan for day 1.  Let’s see how it goes.

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Playday Event in Kilmarnock

Playday activities are taking place in Kay park, Kilmarnock! There will be a variety of activities to take part in with 6 different zones including the Fun Zone, Messy Zone, Physical Zone, Creative Zone, Free Play Zone and Adventure Zone!

Contact details:

Karen Kerr

Email: vibrantcommunities@east-ayrshire.gov.uk

Tel: 01563 576319

 

 

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Brain Hierarchy: When Your Child’s Lower Brain Levels Are Weak, they Can’t Learn

Did you know that the brain of an infant contains essentially all the brain cells that they will ever need for learning throughout their lifespan? Add this to the knowledge that a newborn baby’s brain is about a third the size of an adult brain, but has all the mechanics it needs to develop speech, language, balance, coordination, executive functioning and sensory input.  Full blog

 

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