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New Playful Pedagogy Resource from Play Scotland to support everyday learning adventures across the school

Playful Pedagogy is a way of integrating children’s play experiences with curricular learning, giving pupils the flexibility to find their own solutions to both new and existing problems. It engages children in personally meaningful activities, learning about themselves and others, and encourages autonomy and their independent motivation-to-learn.

This resource is for Headteachers, teachers and schools who wish to carry forward this vision of best practice and to teach better, develop their professional skills, and enjoy themselves more along the way.

https://www.playscotland.org/resources/20592/

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S&SR Environment and Spaces Group Publication

 

The MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit of the S&SR Environment and Spaces Group “Change in use of green and open space following COVID-19 lockdown ‘stay at home’ phase and initial easing of lockdown” publication is now live on the MRC website.

 

 

http://bit.ly/greenspacesreport

https://www.gla.ac.uk/researchinstitutes/healthwellbeing/research/mrccsosocialandpublichealthsciencesunit/aboutus/covid19/

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Playful Schools: The power of Loose Parts Play

Playful Schools, a partnership project delivered with Scrap Antics has demonstrated that outdoor, free play is crucial to children’s mental health and wellbeing and provision of free play opportunities within the context of Covid-19 is entirely feasible.

Find the report here – https://www.playscotland.org/resources/playful-schools-the-power-of-loose-parts-play/

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Covid-19 and Children’s Play – update 2 September 2020

Play Scotland is a member of the UK Children’s Play Policy Forum which has commissioned this COVID 19 and Play analysis and update. Information on the COVID 19 virus and its direct impact on children’s health and indirect impact (physical, mental, social) via curtailment of play outdoors is accumulating as research continues. The findings include concerns about the risks to children from outdoor play deprivation.

“Experts in child development and child psychiatry agree that children are experiencing multiple harms as a consequence of play deprivation. There has been a failure to properly assess the risks of collateral damage to children and adolescents.” 

https://www.playscotland.org/resources/covid-19-and-childrens-play-update-2-september-2020/

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IPA Covid Report: Play in Lockdown

An international study of government and civil society responses to Covid-19 and their impact on children’s play and mobility

The report gives international data on Covid19 pandemic control measures and their impact on outdoor play and mobility, and calls for greater attention to children’s rights. The main finding is that country responses have varied hugely. In quantifying this, the report unveils a new indicator of the severity of national lockdown measures, (the ‘Child Lockdown Index’). The home nations are in the middle of the range when it comes to their CLI – see Figure 1 on page 6.

https://www.playscotland.org/resources/ipa-covid-report/

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Indoor activity guidance

Re-opening of unregulated indoor children’s activity

Scottish Government’s message on guidance:

Schools and regulated ELC are beginning again from 11 August and we are receiving queries about whether other indoor activity may resume at the same time.

The answer is that indoor activities for children and young people which are not overseen by a regulator should not start again until agreed guidance is in place.  Unfortunately, back to school does not mean back to normality and for now, ensuring that the transition back to school is successful is our top priority.

For now, activities for children and young people under the age of 18  should continue online or outdoors in line with existing guidance. 

We know that these indoor activities are of huge value to children, young people and families across Scotland and our ambition is to get them open soon as soon as this is deemed appropriate.  We will provide further information about timing with additional guidance where this is necessary.

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Play Scotland asks for more space for play

At the beginning of Playday week, Calum Duncan, Chair of Play Scotland asks for more space for play

Even while restrictions are being relaxed, and children no longer have the need to distance, being playful remains crucial. Play is a vital and simple way for families and siblings to feel connected; it is a tonic in the face of anxiety, and it is a way of exploring ideas as an opportunity for intuitive learning.

However, we are challenged by good appropriate space, inside and out, for everyone to play and explore. As restrictions are lifting, traffic is significantly increasing again on our streets. However, public transport remains restricted, and soon more people will be gradually returning to places of work.

Local authorities are expanding the provision of space for pedestrians and cyclists to maintain distancing, and we would encourage these improvements to be implemented as extensively and boldly as possible. Space is needed for children and young people to PLAY, as well as all of us to get fresh air and exercise.

In built up areas, parks and greenspace are already under pressure, and we can extend this space within our towns and cities through appropriate road closures for play, walking and exercise.

This could be roads which are next to parks and schools, even rewilding some of these streets, or considering new connections to woodlands and greenspace which are currently not available or less known. A busy road junction adjacent to schools could be transformed into an expanded playground space, whilst calming car use too. A stretch of residential street could be closed where residents have limited or no gardens.

Closed sections of roads can become space to play on bikes, skateboard, chalk drawing, clowning, games and ball games between siblings, play musical instruments, or to simply relax and escape the indoors with space to breathe.

In the UK overall, 15% of dwellings have no access to private outdoor space. Only 25% of flats have outdoor space and dwellings in the most deprived areas are least likely to have private outdoor space.

It is not just for local authorities to take actions on these issues, we can all help. For every single journey we need to make, the less we drive, the slower we drive, the more we cycle and the more we walk, the more space we are making for all ages to enjoy and play. We have an opportunity to change our mindsets which will improve play space, mentalhealth and wellbeing, as well as the air quality for all of us. Lets make space to play and breathe.

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Guidelines for unregulated, informal play services

“Given the importance of play to children’s health and wellbeing it is vital through this crisis that all children and young people can regain access to play opportunities in a range of settings which offer variety, adventure and challenge.”

John Swinney, MSP, Deputy First Minister

Play Scotland is pleased to release Guidelines for unregulated, informal play services which are intended to support the play sector as they consider resuming outdoor organised activities. We hope to be able to release further advice and guidelines over the coming weeks.

Play Scotland Guidelines for Services

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Is It Right To Take Your Kids To The Playground Now It’s Allowed?

Paul Hunter, a professor of medicine and expert in infectious diseases based at the University of East Anglia, says it’s important to remember the risk of children contracting the virus is minimal – particularly outdoors where there’s better ventilation, and the virus can be killed by UV light. Read more here:

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/is-it-right-to-take-your-kids-to-the-playground-now-lockdown-has-eased_uk_5efdb343c5b6acab284bffe6?guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvLnVrLw&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAEyvi7lN5r4WhhS1Edwh0nJ_NfGpmvbTXCH8_ySvAkp785UzFTGMCSmeza7w2P8Cnk9BK_z06AQt1MSatXIxw0t5OIdQD5ioKIyLABHlyJJGtJntRGBq4kYlHpWkqo_Fo5Xs5E-hYyQxLWHaXS9wymYSr0NqL3hshrQDOvdiuleW&guccounter=2

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